DIY Pet First Aid Tips With a Holistic Twist

DIY Pet First Aid Tips With a Holistic Twist

DIY Pet First Aid, Holistic pet care, mattiedogRecently I was reading a pet-related industry insiders report that said ‘first aid for pets is a relatively new category in the animal industry.’ Relatively new? No it’s not…if you are like me and share your life with an animal, you know that first aid is one of the primary things on our minds. The health and wellbeing of my dogs is paramount to sharing a quality human-animal bond with him. The report went on to add that the most common complaint from pet owners was knowing how to address skin and paw issues. After digesting this article I thought that maybe what it was truly reporting on was the growth of commercially viable answers (e.g. products) in response to a pet first aid survey. So, I thought I might save you some time and money by sharing our very own MattieDog© tried and true DIY pet first aid tips with a holistic twist.

 

Human and Pet First Aid Differ

First aid kits meant to address human concerns often do not contain the appropriate supplies for animals. Rubbing alcohol pads are included in first aid kids for the primary purpose of killing bacteria. Good in tiny amounts, like for wiping a small spot on your pups skin prior to a shot, however for a cut…you better stand back, cuz ‘that’sa gonna hurt,’ as my grandpa used to say. But what can I do, I hear you asking. I have two bundled terms for you: ‘povidone iodine‘ and ‘epsom salt.’

Holistic DIY Pet First Aid Safety TipsDIY Pet First Aid Tips With a Holistic Twist, by Rebecca Sanchez-The Pet Lifestyle Guru at MattieDog

Skin: Scrapes, Rashes, Pimples/Doggy Acne and Minor Wounds

Povidone iodine is clinically proven to defend against common bacteria (yeast, staph and the like), doesn’t burn and is not toxic should your dog lick his/her skin post application. You can buy povidone iodine in any pharmacy. To apply povidone iodine to your furry one’s skin you need to:

  • Dilute: depending on the size of the area you are attempting to treat, start by pouring a small amount of iodine in to a glass bowl and then add warm, preferably filtered water to the bowl. While there’s no specifically prescribed measurement, the mixture should eventually attain the color of iced tea.
  • Apply/Compress: use an organic cotton ball or washcloth and soak it in the diluted mixture. Allow the saturated cloth to drip just a little bit, do not squeeze all of the mixture out of it; and gently apply to the area you are intending to treat. Repeat up to a 20 minutes if possible.

Our Own DIY Pet First Aid Povidone Iodine Experience: We spend time in the glorious outdoors of the great Pacific Northwest where towering evergreens coexist alongside the dreaded foxtail plant. Foxtail looks like a tall grass with a wheat-like pod at the end. The end of the foxtail actually is a seed head with hook-like barbs, and is extremely bad news for dogs. We are vigilant about keeping our dogs away from foxtails, yet even so on one Sunday afternoon we returned from a hike and noticed that an area just below one of our Shih Tzu’s eyes was red and slightly swollen.

FoxtailOh no! No vet, as we were deep in the woods in our cabin…so, now what to do? We were prepared to take the four hour journey back to the city but thought we’d try a little DIY pet first aid. Povidone iodine to the rescue! Following the dilute and apply method above, we were able to apply a warm compress to our little furry baby’s eye area, and within 15 minutes the area was softened enough that the foxtail could safely came out. We continued to clean the wound with the mixture and since our Shih Tzu couldn’t lick the area, we applied a small amount of manuka raw honey (for it’s natural antibiotic properties) as well; and her discomfort was gone and skin looked back to normal extremely fast.

Paw: Irritants, Yeast, and Minor Scrapes

Some people have good responses to these paw conditions through the povidone iodine treatment approach; however, there are ways you can add complimentary DIY pet first aid holistic tips to augment the treatment and improve healing. One of the easiest and most cost efficient ways to treat paw issues is by adding a little epsom salt paw-dicure to your dog’s day! Epsom salt contains the potassium, chloride and nitrates that restore your dog’s own natural paw pad bacterial balance; and it’s available from any drug store. Here are our tips:

  • DIY Pet First Aid, Holistic Pet Care, Epsom salt paw soakDilute: pour epsom salts in warm bath water (1 cup to 1 gallon ratio), fill up the tub adequate to the size of your dog so that the water rises just above your dog’s ankles (yes you know what I mean); and swish the mixture to ensure salt is dissolved.
  • Soak: gently place your dog in to the warm diluted salt water for approximately 10 minutes. To help your dog acclimate and enjoy the paw-dicure, make it an experience with soft music, treats, and gentle petting/massage and he will grow to enjoy this time.
  • Wipe: once 10 minutes is up the paw-dicure is over and out comes your pup from the tub. You can drain the water with your dog still in the tub if he doesn’t  mind the noise, however do not rinse. The Epsom salt soak just naturally raised the pH level of your pup’s tootsies, addressing harmful bacteria (that cause itching, irritations, etc.,) and regenerating healthy bacteria (that help keep your pup in tip-top shape).

Our Own DIY Pet First Aid Epsom Salt Experience: Shih Tzu’s are susceptible to yeast imbalances in their paws. A decade ago, before we knew what type of diet might trigger our pup’s yeast imbalances, and as a result have them gnaw their toes, we were less selective about the treats we gave our Tzu’s. Once we put two and two together we visited a holistic vet to learn more, and made the necessary dietary changes she recommended. We also followed her epsom salt soak instructions to help sooth our pup’s itchy yeasty paws, and with just the first paw-dicure our little fuzzy one was no longer chewing his paws – relief! Today, to help ward off pollen and other paw irritants, we incorporate an epsom salt paw-dicure in to our pup’s weekly bathing schedule – and to this day, their tootsie are nibble free. Okay, got me… I nibble on their cute toes every now and again….

Is DIY Always The Answer to Pet Health?

DIY First Aid Pet Care With a Holistic Twist, by Rebecca Sanchez, The Pet Lifestyle Guru at MattieDogDIY is a good way to care for your furry family member after you have established a reliable understanding of your animal’s health attributes and patterns, specifically for non-emergent issues. You want to start off your relationship with your newly adopted family member with the type of confidence that builds through knowledge. Become informed and seek out holistic veterinarians or veterinarians that are open to alternative treatments. Why do we recommend this? Antibiotic prescriptions tend to be dispensed for everything….funny thing about antibiotics though, prolonged exposure often causes yeast infection that become harder and harder to treat. We maintain a very close relationship with all of our dog’s veterinarians, holistic and traditional….and we do have many of them due to adopting seniors and special needs animals. Our dog’s primary vet has been very open to a blended treatment approach that includes holistic treatments!

Holistic Pet Care and Resources

DIY Pet First Aid, Holistic Healthcare for your pet, DIY Pet first aid tips with a holistic twist, Rebecca Sanchez pet lifestyle guruThe pet industry insider report closed by saying that ‘pet owners’ safety concerns include wanting to quickly and effectively treat their pet’s injuries as well as seeking out more holistic and natural products,’ and as you can tell, we couldn’t agree more! Don’t get me wrong, having worked in an inner-city trauma hospital for a majority of my professional career, I totally understand that clinical interventions are necessary and often the most prudent path. However, for minor scrapes and every day pet-related boo boos give holistic pet care a try. Organic, natural and sustainable…hey, what’s good for you is good for your pet. Here are some good DIY pet first aid with a holistic twist resources to help you establish a more connected human-animal bond with your furry family member:

Be Your Animal’s Advocate

Just like when humans experience scrapes and cuts, our animals need someone that will help them along their path to renewed vitality. Be your animal’s advocate, all that it takes is a little know how, open communication with your furry family member’s care team(s) and a willingness to be there when needed. If you are reading this, I know that you are willing. Developing a strong human-animal bond with your pet is one of the most fulfilling and rewarding experiences you can have. Take your time and learn about the DIY pet first aid tips with a holistic twist treatments that I’ve shared with you today – and I’d love to hear your DIY pet first aid with a holistic twist experiences so that we can share, learn and grow together…that’s what a pack does!

Rebecca Sanchez, The Pet Lifestyle Guru at MattieDogThanks for reading, and until next time – take care and keep on lovin’ your dog!

MattieDog A little dog making a big impact in this world, MattieDog, social media superstar, animal advocate, animal author


A little dog making a big impact in this world!® MattieDog Gets Adopted, a dog's view of being rescued and adopted

 

 

Related posts:

Share Some MattieDog!

50 Comments

  1. I’ll definitely pick up some of that iodine next time I’m at the pharmacy! One time, Cow had a minor cut on her foot, and we didn’t know what to do because she wasn’t REALLY our dog at the time, so we gently cleaned with water and taped a sock to her foot until it healed. It worked in a pinch, but I’m glad there’s a better way.
    Lindsay Pevny recently posted…5 New Year’s Resolutions For Being A Better Dog Owner In 2016My Profile

    Reply
    • We always have this as well as epsom salt and high quality tweezers in our house. Tzu’s have non-existent snouts, and so they tend to curiously get their nose in to close some times!

      Reply
    • Yes indeed! We always have it in our house!

      Reply
    • Thats great – we love to share our knowledge and learn from others as well!

      Reply
  2. Ugh. I hate foxtails! Mr. N got one in his foot once. Luckily, it came out pretty easily.

    Reply
    • Foxtails is da pits…dey hurt! We used a warm compress (cotton washcloth soaked and held on our pup for about 20 minutes) and it warmed it and softened it up and momma was able to push it out. It had already started to infect (stinky) and so we were very fortunate!

      Reply
  3. The more that I learn about taking the best care of my dogs, I find myself going toward holistic remedies as well as raw for their food and treats. I am hoping to be completely through with putting chemicals in their system including vaccines and definitely steroids. I will save this page. Thank you!
    M. K. Clinton recently posted…The Whistle Activity Monitor For Dogs – Take 2My Profile

    Reply
    • Thank you – and my parents believe that if we can remove the unneeded and let our bodies work with nature, the way intended we’ll be much more healthy! I applaud your endeavors and will cheer you on every day!

      Reply
  4. I love Dr. Pitcairns book, call it my Bible and always use it when I am in doubt as I am such a Jewish Mom BOL

    Reply
    • This is our go-to book as well!! We absolutely adore this book and have it so bookmarked it looks a bit weathered!

      Reply
    • Us too – it’s empowering and often very helpful, healing and soothing!

      Reply
    • Thank you so much – I appreciate you stopping by and sharing with us!

      Reply
  5. Fantastic post!!! We have a huge bag of Epsom salt on hand and it’s come in handy when Rodrigo has itchy paws (Spring time). I thought it would be hard to keep him still while I soaked his paws, but I think it felt nice so he stayed still 🙂
    Kimberly recently posted…Only Dog Lovers Get My DogSanity #WhenISeeSugarSmileMy Profile

    Reply
    • Thank you! You are so right – most dogs dig the epsom salt paw-dicure soak!

      Reply
  6. These are good to know,. I am bookmarking this for future reference.

    Reply
  7. I’m glad that there are more products and information becoming available for pet first aid. As a cat mom, I don’t often run into injuries with my cats. I think dogs are more prone to rough playing and thus, injury. However, things do happen every once in a great while and it can be scary! It is a good idea to know what to do.
    Robin recently posted…5 Myths About Cats in Cold WeatherMy Profile

    Reply
    • Thanks Robin – yes, it is so important to have a little know-how prior to an emergent situation!

      Reply
  8. It’s always good to know some first aid basics in case of a pet emergency! Great post.

    Reply
    • Thank you and yes, just some basics can go a long way!

      Reply
  9. This is such an important post – I use Epsom Salts with our older guy as he has some pad issues and when they get inflammed I mix the salt with a chamomile blend to help sooth the area.

    Reply
    • So great! In upcoming posts I’m going to add different essential oils, etc to care – thanks for sharing your chamomile blend tip, so important for soothing!

      Reply
  10. Thanks for all of these great tips! Do you happen to know if these are safe for cats as well?

    Reply
    • Thanks – and yes, they are safe for kitties, and even lizards!

      Reply
  11. Great tips – I’ll have to pick up both as not sure we have here. Agree with mixing natural and traditional medicine too.
    Talent Hounds recently posted…Macho Diving dog Dock DivingMy Profile

    Reply
    • Thanks – these are our must stock items!

      Reply
    • Thank you and we appreciate you stopping by!

      Reply
    • Thank you – we love the DIY holistic approach where possible!

      Reply
  12. Great article. I will definitely be picking up some povidone iodine in my travels tomorrow. I love being able to use holistic treatments for Mary whenever possible. Thanks for sharing this. I am definitely pinning this so I have for future reference.
    Suzanne recently posted…Is Your Dog Suffering From Dry Itchy Skin? #BayerExpertCareMy Profile

    Reply
    • Thank you so much for stopping by – and for sharing!

      Reply
  13. What an informative post! I know there are some things that are used on dogs that can’t be used on cats, but I’ll do some research.
    Sweet Purrfections recently posted…Sunday SelfieMy Profile

    Reply
    • Hi there – yes, these can be used on cats! We even have a friend who uses da iodine on her lizard 🙂

      Reply
  14. I never thought of epsom salt for my dog. Fantastic tips!

    Reply
  15. I agree that being your animals advocate is so important. While western medicine provides good treatment, sometimes there are alternatives worth exploring.

    Reply
    • Thanks and we couldn’t agree more – being your animal’s advocate is so important!

      Reply
  16. We always keep epson salts in the house.

    Reply
    • Good move – it’s so helpful to many different types of boo boos!

      Reply
  17. will come in handy

    Reply
  18. Good tips using a lot of things we have around the house already!

    Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This