The Weird History of How World War II Changed Dog Food

The Weird History of How World War II Changed Dog Food

Throughout history, humans have shared their lives with dogs. A companion animal’s diet consisted of food left over from its caretaker’s diet. If a dog’s family was wealthy, then the dog ate better – remember, dogs were a luxury item primarily owned by the rich. The concept of domesticating an animal really took hold in the late 1800’s with the birth of veterinary medicine – the idea being that dogs had to lose their ‘taste’ for blood in order to live with people. Wild animals ate fresh meat and thus domesticated dogs should not. Not science, but the concept took hold. Little by little there was a shift from pets eating natural foods to packaged ‘pet food,’ and then things really took a turn – here’s how World War II changed pet food. More Pet Food History Through the ages, humans have explored the world – looking for new places. One barrier to exploration was food. No different than if you were camping out in the boondocks. While you might get dirty without a shower, and have to be creative with your bathroom activity, you could only stay out in the middle of nowhere until you ran out of food and water… Or you’d die. Same was true for world exploration. Thus ‘packaged’ food was created – think Neil Armstrong and the astronauts. Explorers traveled by boat that, unlike today, required ‘man-power’ to travel across oceans. Man-power required food that would not spoil – and so they were fed things that lacked fresh produce and proteins (as these items would rot), and as a result lacked nutrition. But what they were...

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